Mark Gritter (markgritter) wrote,
Mark Gritter
markgritter

Minnebar 9

Here's how I spent my time on Saturday at the local 900-person "unconference":

Paul Cantrell, "Scheduling Minnebar with Simulated Annealing" Great talk as is usual from Paul. He intro'd by saying that simulated annealing sounds very fancy but really the algorithm is very dumb. For Minnebar, the key metric is whether people can attend all of the sessions they have expressed interest in through the session web tool. So the function being optimized is the mean, over all attendees, of the percent of their sessions they cannot attend due to scheduling. This may mean it's possible to game the system by registering for fewer sessions. Somebody who registers for 6 will have 0.17/N weight for having two sessions scheduled opposite each other, while somebody who expresses interest in just 2 will have 0.5/N weight on their preference. Certainly you should not register for any you don't much care about.

I asked about whether it was possible to do better on assignment to rooms. Currently Paul just assigns time slots first, then greedily puts the session with the largest number of interested people in the largest room. But I think it may be possible to do better than this--- some recurring sessions are known to be very popular and yet do not get placed in the largest venues.

There were quite a few questions of the form "couldn't you find a better/faster solution with X" to which is response was (correctly) "no, we only run this once a year so we don't care very much."

"Pack Your Own Chute - the Personal Decision to Join a Startup", a panel discussion led by Neal Tovsen, with Paul DeBettignies, Liz Tupper, Matt Hardy, and Todd H Gardner. This one was fairly depressing but a good conversation. They talked about the need to set boundaries and have clear communication with your co-founder when forming a startup. How much money are you willing to lose on this project? Where's your bail-out point? What is the worst-case scenario? (They also talked about some of the fun and freedom too.)

What struck me is that everyone on the panel was talking about creating a startup rather than joining one. Nobody talked about taking a smaller plunge by going to work for somebody else's startup first. (I know I found my time at Kealia very valuable when we started Tintri--- and I wasn't even doing the heavy lifting on the corporate/financial/HR side!) But just like you might save up money to make sure you could survive the 18 months it took to bootstrap your startup, it may make total sense to work for 2-3 years in another startup to build connections and experience for your own.

Another issue that was not confronted directly was moving. Relocating is a big cost and one that I totally understand not wanting to pay--- I didn't. But it should be asked: if the only way to make this startup succeed is to move to San Francisco, would you do so?

I learned about Track:js from one of its founders on the panel (and the other seated next to me in the next session!) A good-looking tool for debugging Javascript problems that happen in production systems, and one Tintri might try out.

Reed Robinson, "Lessons from a Failed Startup". The failed startup was Heroic, a local attempt at a recommendation service for home services. (His dad repairs garage openers.) He had a good list which I'll try to reproduce here, but I wish his slides were available:

  1. Validate your assumptions. (Like, "people care about my product", "the team can build the product", and "people will pay for my product.")
  2. Sell it, then build it. Heroic spent lots of time on UX but decided not to ask people to pay right away. For his next venture he wants to sell the idea and find people willing to fund the development. (I am not a huge fan of this model but VC looks like that if you squint at it correctly.)
  3. Acknowledge holes in your team ASAP. He talked about how Heroic lacked marketing, finance, and sales expertise. It's possible to go overboard as well here--- but you also don't want to dig a hole.
  4. See things to fruition. Reed gave an example of promotions that were tried and quickly discarded after only a week or so. Some strategic moves need time.
  5. Do things that other people don't want to do. His father gets ten emails a week from people wanting to partner with him. Very crowded space, maybe focus on something less "sexy".
  6. Intimately know your cash situation. Ties in with holes in the team.
  7. Have confidence, but don't take yourself too seriously. Celebrate successes.


Bridget Kromhout, Monitoring at a SaaS Startup. Talked about her work in ops at 8thBridge, and a wide variety of tools. One thing the Tintri support lead emphasizes is that alerts need to be actionable--- don't wake somebody up in the night for something they can't fix. Bridget reinforced this message strongly. Nagios is old but still a good tool for ensuring alerts are what you want. Some of the newer tools like Sensu are so complicated that ops people fear they need monitoring on their monitoring tool.

She shared a couple stories in which 8thBridged goofed some by not using some of the information they had available. MongoDB's MMS was telling them about a global write lock problem but they weren't monitoring or alerting on it. Etsy has a very good monitoring team and tries to monitor even those things that don't seem to be moving, "just in case they make a run for it."

Tools: Graphite and StatsD for collecting and showing stats (they feed info into nagios from them for actual alerting), Whisper for storing time-seris data, Carbon for buffering and storing stats. Slides with more references here: http://www.slideshare.net/bridgetkromhout/monitoring-at-a-saas-startup

Maybe Tintri should look at providing stats directly into some of these tools. She talked about Logstache (?), Kibana, and ElasticSearch as some next-generation tools it might be worth looking into.)

Jeff Lin of BustOut Solutions, "Chasing Ninja Rockstars: Searching for Top Talent and Why We're Doing it All Wrong". I should have given one this a miss. The key problem, as Jeff admitted, is that he doesn't do much hiring. His 13-person team is 5x smaller than the number of hires Tintri made last quarter. So when we asked questions like how to source more diverse candidates, or how to get team buy-in to change hiring practices, he didn't have any suggestions.

He had some good points about team culture mattering, and creativity requiring diversity, but it was not very practical advice on how to get there.

Jeff told an anecdote that pissed me off. At a previous company (not BustOut) his boss took the resumes and filtered out all those with Master's or PhD degrees and said he basically didn't want to hire anybody who had spent too much time in the "ivory tower" because they were out of touch with technology trends.

I'm not sure what Jeff thought the point of this story was (I think it was in support of skills over credentialism) but it directly contradicted much of the rest of what he said about looking for good problem-solvers and people who were enthusiastic learners. Nobody goes for their PhD to get a better salary. (The same may not necessarily be true of MSCS.) I suspect a not-so-subtle side effect is that Jeff's old boss didn't want to pay more for developers.

James Renkin, "Building A Global, Privacy-Conscious CDN On $20 A Day". This talk was pure geeky joy. James located 11 sites throughout the globe that were willing to let his virtual server peer with their BGP (the Internet's routing protocol.) He was thus able to create a content distribution network on his own using BGP anycast to direct users to the "closest" (sort of) server. This is what the big guys do (some root DNS servers use it, Akamai might but usually just uses DNS redirection.) But he did it for an outlay of about $7000/year. About $500 of that is the IP address range (which you have to jump through multiple hoops to get--- he's got an ISP side business which he was able to leverage.) The remainder is running the servers and additional charges for injecting his route into BGP. I learned a lot of this stuff during my PhD work, so this talk made me really happy. I have no intention of duplicating his work, though.

The conference had a couple innovations that didn't work so well. Best Buy let us use their employee parking garage this year instead of visitor parking, but frankly it's a maze (not very well marked, poor traffic flow.) They only had one exit gate opening to leave and more than one person got into the wrong lane.

The organizers brought in food trucks to serve lunch but the lines were long and it was not all that warm a day to be standing outside. I think three trucks was insufficient; it didn't help that it was not clear there were three separate lines, and that one of the trucks opened late.

There was also a keynote from an agile coach that I didn't get much out of. I was amused that he emphasized subtracting things to get more productivity but he's usually called in as an "add" to the team.
Tags: geek, minnebar, minnesota
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