Mark Gritter (markgritter) wrote,
Mark Gritter
markgritter

People Like What They're Used To. Spammers Invade Comment Threads. Also, Rain is Wet.

A tweet pointed me at this March 2009 article reporting that students increasingly prefer the sound of MP3 encoding over less-lossy alternatives.

I find the comments section interesting though, too. We have audiophiles insisting that vinyl really does sound better than CDs. Pedants claiming that the discussion is pointless because the experiment hasn't been published. A strange theory that the brain has to "work harder" to listen to an MP3 than FM radio (?!?). Obviously, there is a lot of emotion at work here. But the discussion winds down after about a month.

The first spammer shows up August 2009. That seems to reignite some interest.

October 2009: 3 real comments, 3 spam comments
December 2009: 2 real comments
January 2010: 1 spam
February 2010: 1 spam
March 2010: 2 spammers
April 2010: 3 spammers
May 2010: 2 real comments, 1 spam link *preceded* by an introductory comment!
June 2010: 1 real comment, 3 spam entries, including one sophisticated entry referencing the title of the page
July 2010: 1 real comment
August 2010: 1 spam
September 2010: 4 spammers (including Medieval Weapons spam!)
October 2010: 2 spammers, including one with a malformed link
December 2010: 1 probably-spam
February 2011: 1 thoughtful comment whose username is a spam link. Wow!
March 2011: 1 spam

I am frankly amazed at the amount of effort put into inserting spam into this article. As the recipient of a slow but steady stream of LJ spam, I do have to wonder what the going rate is for this sort of activity. Is the value of the link must be purely in google-whuffies? Or is there a good enough response rate of people doing searches, finding an old article, and clicking through for music searches, help for single mothers, and "Lenjerie Femei"?
Tags: internet, music, spamomancy
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 1 comment